Through the Clear Recital

Commentaries and thoughts on the words of the Clear Recital

Phases of creation (Creation 1.8-16)

18 July, 2018 | Uncategorised

And each fragment was filled with Her delight, and therefore was living. And some grew in the deep earth, and were plants and trees; some ran about the ground or flew above it; and those first-made that had no place to be set down became the fishes and creatures of the sea. And every thing was silver. And She laughed. And at the edges, where the waters had been parted, they lay still and shallow; and there She cast Her gaze. And She saw an image of Herself, all suffused in the light of love and energy. And She laughed. And as She laughed, the image rose up from the water and stood before Her. And this was the first of Her daughters. And she was filled with love for Her, and therefore was the first creature of spirit. And she knew cunning, and she ran about the earth with love of all things, giving a name to every thing and creature, each in the order that She had shaped them. And the Mistress of All Things was filled with delight, and ran laughing through the forests of the earth. And every peal of Her voice became the image of a silver fragment of Her Spirit. And the trees and rivers were filled with nymphs and every kind of sprite. And all were Her daughters. And Her love for each was inexhaustible, for each was a reflection of some boundless fragment of Her unbounded Spirit. And all their multitude did not exhaust the number of the fragments of Her Spirit. And to each was given the governance of some earthly thing.

- Creation 1.8-16.

Every culture has some kind of creation story: stories about the beginning of the world and how their people came into existence. They evolved into a more intricate mythology, and ultimately, into a codified religion in many of the world's cultures and nations.

When we talk about creation stories and the Clear Recital as a body of sacred texts, it is important that we interpret and understand them from a metaphysical standpoint. None of the narratives we find in the Clear Recital points to any specific person, place, or event archaeologists and historians can "prove" their existences. Rather, they convey the eternal truth in a symbolic and metaphorical language in order to communicate the matters that cannot not be true.

Because of this, we must pay close attention to details. Each word is found in the text for a reason.

A shallow reading is to rush through this chapter and simply conclude that Goddess (the "Mistress of All Things" here) created the universe and done with it, and might draw a conclusion that this is simply another creation story that seems to be plagiarized from the Jewish/Christian Bible.

Verse 8: "And each fragment was filled with Her delight, and therefore was living."

Contrast this with Genesis 2:7, in which only humans became a "living being" upon God breathing into adam's (the Genesis 2 adam, or "man," was not yet differentiated into sexes, an entirely non-binary being encompassing both Adam and Eve) nostrils the breath of life.

In the Clear Recital, the life force is the delight of Goddess (and is available universally, not just to the human species alone). Conversely, life only exists where there is the delight of Goddess.

Uniting ourselves with the divine delight gives us life and strengthens us (compare with Nehemiah 8:10).

Now, these days the word "delight" does not have a very strong meaning. But it originally meant "high degree of pleasure or satisfaction" (circa 1200 CE) and it encompassed "pleasure, delight, and sexual desire." It was primal. It wasn't some kind of ethereal sense of contentment that is disembodied and "spiritualized." What else can be more life-giving than a sexual desire (and going back to the word's French and Latin origins, allure)?

Verse 8: "And some grew in the deep earth, and were plants and trees; some ran about the ground or flew above it; and those first-made that had no place to be set down became the fishes and creatures of the sea."

The biodiversity of this planet always impresses me. When you go into a forest, pick a small patch of land -- just a square foot of it -- and count how many species of plants you can find in that small square. They are co-existing and supporting one another in a symbiotic relationship. By contrast, human agriculture and horticulture tend to be monotonous. Every creation, according to the Clear Recital, is a unique fragment of Goddess that is filled with primal life force called delight!

Verse 8: "And every thing was silver."

All creations, in all their diversity, equally reflect the same white (i.e. full spectrum of light, a sum of all colors) light, all sharing the same nature and glory of Goddess. (In some versions of the Clear Recital, this is "golden" instead of silver, but the point is the same -- all creations are suffused with glory.)

Verse 9: "And at the edges, where the waters had been parted,"

Here I'd like you to pay close attention. At this point, the world was already partitioned into two (in verse 2, Goddess splits the world into sea and sky). Here, She creates the third division of the world, the land.

What can we learn from this? Although everything is equally an expression of Goddess and all is one, the creation process required division, for the sake of diversification. Fish cannot live on a mountain, and birds cannot live on the sea bed. By partitioning the world into several distinct areas, diversity became possible.

Verse 9: "and there She cast Her gaze. And She saw an image of Herself, all suffused in the light of love and energy."

Verse 10: "And as She laughed, the image rose up from the water and stood before Her. And this was the first of Her daughters. And she was filled with love for Her, and therefore was the first creature of spirit."

Until here, all creations were filled with the delight of Goddess, but not love. The humans are called the first creature of spirit, with ability and capacity for love.

Further down in verse 11, "she [the first human being] ran about the earth with love of all things" and gave names to all things.

Naming requires love. Power of naming without love is harmful.

(An interesting question to ponder: Goddess did not have love for other creations, just delight; but somehow the first human being did. Why?)

Verse 12: "And the Mistress of All Things was filled with delight, and ran laughing through the forests of the earth."

This forest Goddess motif finds its echo in the Greek lore of Artemis.

Verses 13-16: "And every peal of Her voice became the image of a silver fragment of Her Spirit. And the trees and rivers were filled with nymphs and every kind of sprite. And all were Her daughters. And Her love for each was inexhaustible, for each was a reflection of some boundless fragment of Her unbounded Spirit. And all their multitude did not exhaust the number of the fragments of Her Spirit. And to each was given the governance of some earthly thing."

Here we see the third kind of creation.

The first kind of creation were the plants and animals, who were filled with delight.

The second kind of creation was the human being, who were filled with delight and love, and was a creation of spirit.

The third kind were the nymphs and sprites, who were expressions of the sounds of Goddess.

The first and second kinds came into being out of the laughter of Goddess. But the third one came out of the peal of Her voice.

And they were given governance of some earthly things, as representations of the divine voice.